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The Latest at the Blanton

The Blanton Builds: Your New Museum

June 28, 2016 | Blanton Museum of Art

August 20 – December 23, 2004

Showcasing the new Blanton museum complex and plaza currently under construction on the corner of Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. and Congress Avenue, this exhibition features architectural plans, computer renderings, and a pictorial timeline of the building project. The new Blanton Museum will for the first time in the museum’s history unite its collections, and exhibitions under one roof. Come by to get a preview of the next big thing for Austin and the University of Texas to open in early spring 2006.

Roz – A Video

June 28, 2016 | Blanton Museum of Art

August 20 – December 23, 2004

The Blanton joins Cinematexas in presenting Roz (2004) a work by prominent video artist Burt Barr. Compelling and emotionally fraught, Roz depicts a beautiful young woman (the performer Roz LeBlanc) standing in the shower, water pouring over her head and shoulders. The woman opens her mouth and begins to sing. Instead of her own voice, however, we hear the deep, resonant voice of veteran soul singer Otis Clay. Over the course of the next several minutes, the woman lip-synchs the lyrics to Clay’s recording of the tragic ballad “The Banks of the Ohio,” which tells the tale of a man who murdered the woman he loved.

Twister: Moving Through Color, 1965-1977

June 28, 2016 | Blanton Museum of Art

August 20 – December 23, 2004

Be swept up in a world where paintings seem to spin, shimmer and twist. This exhibition will captivate viewers with vibrant, colorful paintings from the Blanton’s Latin American collections. Created in the 1960s and 1970s, when many claimed that painting was “dead,” the artists represented in Twister embraced the medium with conviction, confident that painting was just as relevant as video, sculpture, and performance.

500 Years of Prints and Drawings

June 28, 2016 | Blanton Museum of Art

August 20 – December 23, 2004

This final installment of 500 Years of Prints and Drawings includes 16th-century reproductions of ancient sculpture; interpretations of Titian, one of the great Renaissance painters masterpieces; the debut of the Blanton’s full of collection of the early modern lithographs of Theodore Gericault; and contemporary artist William Kentridge’s compelling, sculptural “drawing” in paper, and represents the unique breadth and quality of the Blanton’s collection.